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April 22nd 2021, Thursday
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Extended or significant rubbing of the skin can lead to a blister. You then see a build up of fluid (plasma) between the upper and lower layers of the skin. It is, in fact, a second-degree burn. Burning, red skin is the first symptom.

The chance of getting blisters increases during hot weather or on hot surfaces. Particularly if your feet are in poorly ventilated shoes. If this is the case, less rubbing is required to weaken the skin layers.

When it’s cold, the skin is also more susceptible to blisters as blood circulation through the skin is not as efficient.

A fluid or blood blister on the hand (cycling) or feet (walking or running).

If the blister is not a problem, leave it intact. If it is in a tricky location, there is a risk that it could burst (e.g. rubbing in your shoes), then prick it to open it. Treat an open blister like a wound on the skin. See a doctor if the blister becomes infected.

  • Running
    • Wear running socks that are not 100% cotton, in combination with running shoes. Make sure that there are no folds in the sole.
    • Make sure that your shoes have been worn in.
    • Make sure that your shoes and socks are and stay dry.
  • Cycling
    • Wear good running gloves that reduce pressure and prevent rubbing.
    • You can also apply tape (a double layer) to the handlebars.
  • Walking
    • Wear walking shoes that fit properly and which have been worn in.

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