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How to exercise safely on public roads!


Anyone who uses public roads when they are exercising knows they have to be careful. Nevertheless, we have all forgotten to take the risks into account when pushing our physical boundaries. A few tips to make your road-based sporting activities a little safer…

Be seen!

Make sure that you can be seen when out and about. Those who exercise on the roads must make sure they are highly visible. Wear fluorescent or reflective clothing or pull on a safety vest. Take a light or wear illuminated sweatbands. This will ensure you stay visible in the dark so that other road-users can see you.

Signal your manoeuvres.

Let the cars and cyclists around you know what you’re going to do so that they can take you into account. Stick your hand out if you are turning off or crossing and make eye-contact with other road-users. You then know whether or not they have seen you. Respect the traffic regulations: cross at a crossing point and wait until the traffic lights have turned green. If there is no crossing point in the vicinity, choose a well-lit place to cross the road: don’t cross on a bend, on a hill, under a bridge or between parked cars.

Outline your route before you leave

If you know where you’re going when you leave, you can be aware of dangerous points and avoid busy roads. If there is no footpath, cycle route or verge, run on the right hand side so that you are facing oncoming traffic.

Take a mobile phone with you

It can’t hurt to have a mobile phone in your pocket. In an emergency, you may need it.


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